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Trego County, Kansas

Trego County was organized on June 21, 1879, by Edgar Poe Trego; Albert F. Warren; and James Keeney. The county was named for Edgar Poe Trego, and contains the cities of Collyer and  WaKeeney.

The WaKeeney Presbyterian Church was founded in 1878. The first county fair was held in 1910, and the first school district was formed in WaKeeney in 1884. The district was organized in 1882 five miles south of Colby.

In 1878 an alarm over the Cheyenne Indian outbreak in the area curtailed settlement; however, in 1879 a great influx of settlers arrived from Chicago increasing the population from minimal to over 3,500 allowing for county organization. It’s said that during the last Indian raid in the county, an Indian was killed. The body was discovered much later and his skeleton was dressed in a suit, placed on the stage to Hill City by some fun-loving men, and sent on his way. When the stage driver discovered who his passenger was, he departed the stage without hesitation. Also, supposedly gold was discovered by some men in the shale along the Smoky River. After a considerable exchange of currency, the men who discovered the gold disappeared never to be seen again.

Mela Meisner Lindsay, author of The White Lamb and several other books, relate her true accounts of her life and hardships as a young girl in the Russian Volga River area and the difficulties of her migration to Trego County.

Trego County includes the sites of Kenney House, Gibson Drugstore, and Wilcox School.

For more information see the Trego County website.The Trego County Historical Society has research materials concerning the county, and publishes a yearly booklet with updated or new information.

Entry: Trego County, Kansas

Author: Kristina Gaylord

Date Created: February 2010

Date Modified: July 2011

The author of this article is solely responsible for its content.