Jump to Navigation

Kansas artisans

The Museum Store and Capitol Store work with these Kansas artisans in providing uniquely Kansas made products. Find information about vendor opportunities.

AlBo Glass

Housed in an 1888 Potwin home in Topeka, Kansas, AlBo began operation in 1990 by family members who enjoy making beautiful and functional objects with molten crystal.

Well known for the production of glass forms, AlBo began as a union of mother and daughter and has become an evolving synthesis of family, friends. and artistic creation. The company produces affordable glass art to beautify the home and one-of-a-kind sculptural pieces. The artisans take delight in the vibrant colors and the way glass can magically capture and transmit light in a brilliant palette of colors. They are drawn together by love and the art that singes arm hairs.

The Museum Store, Capitol Store, and Museum Store online include AlBo Glass’ colorful orbs. Browse our selection of their products.

AlBo Glass of Topeka

b. e.

Located in Lawrence, Kansas, b. e. (Bazil Essentials, Nurture Botanicals) was born from Courtney Gray’s desire to sustain her “habit of wanting lovely smelling things created from sustainable and eco-friendly ingredients.” Her products are inspired by nature and designed to be good for the body. She seeks out sustainable, fair trade, organic raw materials whenever possible for a better product and a better world.

Each product is backed with years of learning, experience, and hard work. The products are completely handcrafted and carefully formulated in small batches in her downtown Lawrence studio. From start to finish, Gray loves what she does and hopes those who use her products enjoy them as much.

The Museum Store, Capitol Store, and Museum Store Online include Bazil Essential candles, salts, and soaps. Browse our selection of her products.

b. e. Bazil Essentials

The Brass Twig

The jewelry shop in Hutchinson, Kansas, features vintage looks and modern designs. These unique handmade creations are made with love and care to inspire customers.

Long was born and raised a true Kansan.  She spent my college years on the east coast, but came back to Kansas to settle down.  Long has always enjoyed making jewelry, and began by creating gifts for friends and family for holidays.  When she is not working a full time job with children or chasing her son around, she creates jewelry as therapy.  She began The Brass Twig in 2012 as a means to support her jewelry making habit, and now serves a growing customer base.  She loves the saying "We meet no ordinary people in our lives.  If you give them a chance, everyone has something amazing to offer."  Anonymous

For her creations, Leah Long chooses pieces that are dear to her heart.  She loves making jewelry, and takes personal care to bring customers unique items that inspire them.

The Museum Store, Capitol Store, and Museum Store online include earrings and necklaces from The Brass Twig. Browse our selection of her products.

Leah Long, The Brass Twig, Hutchinson

Clay Cellar

Located in Manhattan, Kansas, the Clay Cellar studio creates art with the flow and grace of the universe. These unique items complement any home, contemporary or traditional décor.

Inspired by raku, an ancient art dating back to 16th century Japan, owner/designer Joyce Furney uses different glazes, colorations of the clay, and firing techniques to create beautiful, unique pieces. Furney lends her creative eye to many pieces for the home, perfect with contemporary or traditional décor.

The Museum Store, Capitol Store, and Museum Store online include necklaces, pendants, and earrings from Clay Cellar, plus decorative frames and boxes. Browse our selection of her products.

Joyce Furney with Clay Cellar of Manhattan

Collins Jewelry Design

Bill Collins began designing for fine jewelry manufacturers in northern California. In 1991 the family returned to Lawrence, Kansas, where he makes wonderful pieces for customers.

After finishing his undergraduate degree in jewelry and design at the University of Kansas, Collins spent several years working in northern California with several fine jewelry manufacturers. After designing and creating jewelry for others, his family returned to Kansas where he has focused on custom jewelry. At his Lawrence studio, he has enjoyed designing and making many wonderful pieces for clients since 1991.

The Museum Store, Capitol Store, and Museum Store online include Collins’ necklaces and pendants. Browse our selection of his products.

Bill Collins with Collins Jewelry Design of Lawrence

Delicate Hammer Studio

Louise Carroll earned a degree from the University of Kansas in metalsmithing and jewelry design. She exhibits her work throughout the Midwest at shows and in galleries.

She is excited to participate in the Kansas State Capitol copper project. She turned to the Kansas Museum of History for inspiration, then to the state's landscape with beautiful sunrises and sunsets. She uses prisma-color pencils and a layering technique to make colorful backgrounds for the Flint Hills, prairie fields, and farm scenes. Her other work is inspired by textiles and she adapted some of those designs to the copper projects. She makes the delicate lace with a roller printed onto copper. She is pleased by the strength of the lace against the green patinated copper. Toward the end of the process the lace crumbles but maintains a permanence in the metal. Each element is carefully chosen and assembled with cold connections to keep the patina of the original. No two pieces are the same. They are all heat treated and protected with a wax product to keep colors vibrant with no maintenance.

The Museum Store, Capitol Store, and Museum Store online feature Delicate Hammer Studio copper products. Browse our selection of her products.

Louise Carroll of Delicate Hammer Studio

Elemental Jewelry Company

Kristen Haug, a metalsmith in Silver Lake, Kansas, believes materials should inspire the piece. She creates jewelry items with historic copper from the Kansas State Capitol roof.

Haug’s wearable art combines gemstones for embellishment on unusual materials to emphasize their beauty. The copper pieces she makes exclusively for the Capitol Store are set in specially built environments or nests. Haug has created numerous earrings and pendants with the historic copper. She pictures one series as doors that lead to a magical garden with vines of silver, offset with amethysts or agates. She has had a lifelong admiration for the natural beauty of stones. Haug received a design degree from the University of Kansas and a graduate gemologist certification from the Geological Institute of America. She allows materials to inspire her pieces, and expects that the piece will provide enjoyment for more than one season.

The Museum Store, Capitol Store, and Museum Store online include Haug’s necklaces and pendants. Browse our selection of her products.

Kristen Haug with Elemental Jewelry Company

Elk Falls Pottery

Using clay from Barton County, Kansas, Steve and Jane Fry of Elk Falls create stoneware truly of the state. They appreciate early American stoneware, which influences their work today.

The Frys learned about the Barton County clay deposit on a field trip while attending Hesston College in the early 1970s. They travel to the area once a year for their clay supply. Following college, they worked with traditional pottery in the living history village of Westville, near Lumpkin, Georgia, where they gained an appreciation for early American stoneware. They established Elk Falls Pottery in 1976, located near a beautiful waterfall in southeast Kansas. Through their small family enterprise, they continue to make traditional stoneware, maintaining the high quality afforded with things made by hand.

The Museum Store, Capitol Store, and Museum Store online include Fry’s pottery. Browse our selection of their products.

 

Steve and Jane Fry with Elk Falls Pottery in Elk Falls

FriesenArt

Daisy Friesen of McPherson, Kansas, creates handmade pottery one piece at a time. Working on a potter's wheel or with slabs, she designs pieces with hand-incised elements inspired by nature.

Friesen mixes her own lead-free glazes for one-of-a-kind art pieces that evoke the beauty of Kansas. Her products are designed to be food safe, unless otherwise noted.

The Museum Store, Capitol Store, and Museum Store online include Friesen’s one-of-a-kind pottery. Browse our selection of her products.

Daisy Friesen with FriesenArt of McPherson

Diane Fuller Jewelry

Barbara Lee Fuller and Dianne Gates are the mother and daughter team who form Inspiration Creations of Berryton, Kansas. They are inspired by the beautiful colors in the landscape in the state and express this natural beauty through their jewelry, pottery, and fiber art.

Gates, pictured at left, attended Bethany College in Lindsborg and Washburn University in Topeka. From her Berryton studio she creates dichroic glass, a term that describes the color change in certain lights that make the glass appear iridescent or metallic. Gates’ beautiful pieces take the form of gemstone jewelry, pottery, and paintings.

The Museum Store, Capitol Store, and Museum Store online include Gates’ necklaces and earrings. Browse our selection of her products.

Dianne Gates with Inspiration Creations of Berryton

Shalene Henley

Shalene Henley of Ulysses, Kansas, makes jewelry with historic copper from the Kansas State Capitol roof. She creates beautiful pieces with the ugliest chunks of copper, letting nature inspire her designs.

A native of Oklahoma, Henley earned a master’s degree of fine arts in metalsmithing. Through experimentation she has discovered a perfect pairing of her skill with the historic copper material. Henley enjoys scraping off bits of tape and other remnants that remained on the copper during its years on the Capitol roof. These efforts tend to reveal inner beauty of the material. She enjoys being a Kansas transplant and highlighting the state’s natural beauty through her work.

The Museum Store, Capitol Store, and Museum Store online include Henley’s unique metal work. Browse our selection of her products.

Shalene Henley uf Ulysses

Images on Stone

Using Kansas limestone, Phyllis Shanks of Concordia, Kansas, paints hundreds of different intricate scenes of life and nature for paperweights and other decorative objects.

Shanks and her husband, Bob, were running a family-owned business in Concordia, when in 1996 she decided to learn a new trade—painting. She began with images on wood. After Bob retired, he helped market her items, and suggested that she try stone painting. Her first attempt was an eagle.  

Shanks continued to create a variety of images on stone and received positive response from customers. Today she creates more than 200 images on limestone rocks. She has also begun making jewelry with polymer clay.

The Museum Store, Capitol Store, and Museum Store online include Shanks’ limestone art. Browse our selection of her products.

Phyllis Shanks, Images on Stone

Jelly Lady

Judy Gutzmer, of Sedgwick, Kansas, offers exotic jellies, much picked from the wild, made of dandelion, wild sunflower, sandhill plum, and jalapeno mixed with cream cheese.

Located near Wichita in the small town of Sedgwick, Gutzmer developed a unique line of flavors. Inspired from wild native plants, she creates exotic jellies, jams, and gift sets with flavors unavailable elsewhere. Gutzmer often picks the fruit from the wild. Made with interesting plants found in pastures and out in the country, Gutzmer’s products truly offer an old-fashioned taste sensation.

The Museum Store, Capitol Store, and Museum Store online include Gutzmer’s unique jams, jellies, and butters. Browse our selection of her products.

Judy Gutzmer, Jelly Lady, Sedgwick

Bailey Marable

A high school art teacher, Bailey Marable of Topeka, Kansas, has degrees in art education and metalsmithing from the University of Kansas. She shares her passion for art with her husband, Justin Marable, also an accomplished artist and photographer.

With the discovery of tiny drill bits and saw blades, Marable has challenged herself with fine details created by hand. She loves sawing out letters, animals, and shapes. Marable creates unique jewelry items with pieces with historic copper from the Kansas State Capitol roof.

The Museum Store, Capitol Store, and Museum Store online include Marable’s earrings and necklaces. Browse our selection of her products.

Bailey Marable

Mr. Bacon BBQ

The home of premium barbeque in Lawrence, Kansas, Mr. Bacon BBQ offers a selection of premium sauces, rubs, and spices. These products are made with quality ingredients and a carefully crafted blend for a unique Kansas made flavor.

The special tastes of Mr. Bacon BBQ can be enjoyed at home. The company offers a premium selection of Kansas barbecue sauces with something to please everyone’s taste in the family.

The Museum Store, Capitol Store, and Museum Store online include Mr. Bacon’s sauces, rubs, and seasonings. Browse our selection of their products.

Jeff Frye with Mr. Bacon of Lawrence

Old Muffin Factory

Located near a historic building in McPherson, Kansas, the Old Muffin Factory has been in business since 1990. Their uniquely flavored baking mixes make home baking fun again.

From the heart of wheat country, Les and Kala Mason created Mason Marketing Co. in 1990. They were inspired by the Kansas wheat fields nearby and their mutual love of the baking arts to create unique designer baking mixes.

These mixes include some unusual flavors, like muffin mixes with apple cinnamon or watermelon, pancake mixes with blueberry or piña colada. Bread machine mixes, cookie mixes, and quick bread mixes are among the other offerings. In 2003 the business moved to an older building, which houses wholesale distribution operations. The Old Muffin Factory mixes celebrate the tastes of the heartland.

The Museum Store, Capitol Store, and Museum Store online include these delicious baking mixes from the Old Muffin Factory. Browse our selection of their products.

Old Muffin Factory, McPherson

Patti Pearce

Inspired by her mother, Patti Pearce of Lecompton, Kansas, has been making quilts for more than 30 years. She translates her love of the fabrics, colors, and geometry into unique, custom creations.

When Pearce’s mother began to make quilts, she herself fell in love with the selections of fabrics. She took her first quilting class when her first child was born more than 33 years ago. A few years ago she began to do quilt work for others. She now offers custom t-shirts and quilts.

The Museum Store, Capitol Store, and Museum Store online include Pearce’s custom quilts and table runners. Browse our selection of her products.

Patti Pearce, Lecompton

Paper Treasures

Kathie (Kilhefner) Duguid of Topeka, Kansas, applies the ancient art of quilling to create art from tiny paper scrolls. These unique pieces include jewelry, flowers, bookmarks, and decorative items.

Duguid began quilling many years ago as a hobby and way to create unique Christmas and Easter gifts. From the tiny coils and scrolls of paper, she creates beautiful jewelry, flowers, bookmarks, and other decorative items. Duguid’s husband, Greg, handcrafts custom made tools for her quilling. He also makes wooden bases, metal hangers, and other display items.

The art form of quilling began to flourish in the early 17th century. French and Italian monks and nuns made the first pieces using paper from old documents, letters, and gilt-edged pages. They rolled strips of paper around a large feather quill, creating scrolls and coils to decorate religious symbols and provide detail to pilgrimage mementos. Inspired by this quilling process, Duguid updates the tradition with modern materials and techniques.

The Museum Store, Capitol Store, and Museum Store online include Duguid’s necklaces, earrings, barrettes, and bookmarks. Browse our selection of her products.

Paper Treasures, Topeka

Prairie Glass Studio

Kymm Hughes of Topeka, Kansas, moved from California more than 20 years. She creates unique art with fused glass including pieces with historic copper from the Kansas State Capitol roof.

Hughes discovered the world of fused glass while earning a bachelor’s of fine arts at Washburn University. She had always been interested in art and was delighted to finally find a medium that ignited her passion. She develop that interest into a business, at first teaching summer art camps for children, then expanding her audience to parents. Through a trial and error process, she learned all she could about fused glass and eventually began teaching fused glass at Washburn.

The Museum Store, Capitol Store, and Museum Store online include Hughes’ fused glass pieces. Browse our selection of her products.

Kymm Hughes with Prairie Glass Studio of Topeka

Prairie Light Studio

Edward Sturr has intensively photographed the Konza Prairie near Manhattan, Kansas, since 1990. He meticulously hand colors his black-and-white photographic prints with a variety of colored pencils.

Sturr moved from Illinois to Kansas in 1974, where he practiced and taught photography. He developed an interest in the local landscape and began photographing the tall grass prairie. Since 1990 he has focused intensively on the Konza Prairie.

He enlarges his black-and-white photographs, which he meticulously hand colors using a variety of colored pencils. His work has been in many exhibitions and has won a number of awards including a Mid-America Arts Alliance/National Endowment for the Arts Fellowship in Photography.

In 1997 Sturr started Prairie Light Studio, offering signed and numbered limited edition lithographic prints. He now offers a variety of photographs of the Konza and the Flint Hills area.

The Museum Store, Capitol Store, and Museum Store online include Sturr’s beautiful photographic artwork. Browse our selection of his products.

Edward Sturr with Prairie Light Studio

Rabbit Creek Products

Named for a nearby stream, Rabbit Creek Gourmet Products of Louisburg, Kansas, creates flower pot breads and muffins to taste of old fashioned cooking with a designer style.

Donna Cook founded the company, which she named after a creek that runs through a nearby eastern Kansas town. Rabbit Creek Products emphasizes the state’s role as a leader in wheat production. Cook also highlights the state’s cultural mix through her product selections. The traditional country food influences come from Germany, Sweden, and other parts of the world. Cook grew up in this diverse food environment. She works to capture the taste of old fashioned cooking with a designer style and share it with customers everywhere.

The Museum Store, Capitol Store, and Museum Store online include Rabbit Creek’s bread and muffin mixes. Browse our selection of their products.

Rabbit Creek Products

Arthur Short Bull

A member of the Oglala Lakota Nation, Arthur Short Bull has been creating paintings of American Indians in Kansas since 1991. His settings include villages, the prairie, and buffalo hunts.

Short Bull has been painting professionally since 1991. A member of the Oglala Lakota Nation, his vision for watercolor set in Kansas is to reveal segments of the state’s history that are unknown or ignored. He hopes to tell the history of American Indians before Kansas was a state. His settings include villages, the prairie, and buffalo hunts. Animals are favorite subjects, like buffalo, horses, birds, and other wildlife from the 19th century Great Plains.

The Museum Store, Capitol Store, and Museum Store online include Short Bull’s paintings. Browse our selection of his products.

 

Arthur Short Bull

Studio 285 Clockworx

Andrew E. Mitchell of Lecompton, Kansas, makes a premium line of clocks crafted from Kansas hardwoods. This architect and clockmaker draws upon modern reinterpretations of classic designs.

Studio 285 Clockworx produces clocks from Kansas hardwoods such as oak, walnut, cedar, and hickory. The themes for Mitchell’s clock designs draw upon modern reinterpretations of classic designs. He couples the traditional approach with fresh ideas generated through the free flowing design process.

The Museum Store, Capitol Store, and Museum Store online include Mitchell’s unique clocks. Browse our selection of his products.

 

Andrew Mitchell, Studio 285 Clockworx

Sunflower Food Company

Based in Lenexa, Kansas, Sunflower Food Company produces Kansas-grown farmer’s popcorn. This delicious corn pops right on the cob and is healthy, all-natural, and free of genetically modified ingredients.

Established in 2013, the Sunflower Food is home to the original chocolate covered sunflower seeds. These colorful candy coated seeds make the perfect nutritious snack. The company emphasizes quality, uniqueness, and market appeal in producing its tasty treats.

The Museum Store, Capitol Store, and Museum Store online include delicious snacks from Sunflower Food Company. Browse our selection of their products.

 

Sunflower Food Company, Lenexa

Tobias Jewelry Designs

Brita L. McKee has always felt passionately about art. Her business, Tobias Jewelry Designs, is located in Topeka and creates jewelry items with historic copper from the Kansas State Capitol roof.

From second grade, McKee knew she wanted to be an artist. At the University of Kansas she became involved in the metals program. Her passion led to inspired jewelry creations. She likes to masque her work behind a “plethora of design schemes and colors” that leaves the true intent hidden. This allows for the viewer to reach their own interpretations. She is inspired by recycled material, the cause and effect of science, natural materials, and from her son.

The Capitol Store and Museum Store online include Capitol copper items made by Tobias. Browse our selection of her products.

Brita McKee of Tobias Designs

Kevin Throssell

Kevin Throssell learned to make wire cactus bud baskets from his grandfather. He adapted the technique to make beautiful functional baskets with modern materials.

Throssell’s grandfather used baling wire to make traditional wire baskets that were designed to hold cactus buds, which were plentiful in his native Arizona. The arid desert climate didn’t cause the baling wire to rust. Since Throssell lives in the humid climate of Kansas, he applied a decorative finish that prevented rusting. His basket designs go beyond the utilitarian style. He experiments with other shapes to make the baskets into art forms themselves.

The Museum Store, Capitol Store, and Museum Store online include Throssell’s intricate baskets. Browse our selection of his products.

Kevin Throssell