Jump to Navigation

Puzzles From the Past - Extensions

Ideas for using this trunk with other ages and youth groups.

The teaching manual for this trunk is designed for use in a classroom with students in grades six through eight.  The materials contained in the trunk can be used with other ages and in other settings in a variety of ways as highlighted below.

Native American Studies

Educators looking for Native American materials to use with people of all ages will find this trunk full of possibilities.

Consider using this trunk to teach about:

This trunk contains many objects and photographs educators will find useful in teaching about Native Americans.

  • Each photograph has information on the back about the image.
  • Each object will have one to two laminated cards containing a photograph of the object as well as information about what it is and how it was used. Because the trunk was designed around the lessons in the manual you will find these cards in one of two places. White "object cards" are stored in the bag with the photographs. Four different sets of colored "stratigraphy cards" are stored in the Stratigraphy Kit bag.
  • A list of the contents of this trunk is available online.

Classroom Use

Building a grass house.2004 Kansas History and Government; Economics and Geology Standards about Native Americans in Kansas that items in this trunk correlate to:

  • Grade 1, History Benchmark 2, Indicator 4: Compares types of shelter used by American Indians in Kansas over time (e.g., grass lodge, earth lodge, frame house).
  • Grade 2, History Benchmark 2, Indicator 1: Compares and contrasts daily life of an historic Plains Indian family, a pioneer family, and a modern family in Kansas.
  • Grade 5, History Benchmark 1, Indicator 1: Explains how various American Indians adapted to their environment in relationship to shelter and food (e.g., Plains, Woodland, Northwest Coast, Southeast and Pueblo cultures in the period 1700 - 1820).
  • Grade 5, History Benchmark 1, Indicator 2: Shows how traditional arts and customs of various American Indians are impacted by the environment (e.g., Plains, Woodland, Northwest Coast, Southeast and Pueblo cultures from the period 1700 - 1820).
  • Grade 7, History Benchmark 1, Indicator 1: Compares and contrasts nomadic and sedentary tribes in [pre 1854] Kansas (e.g., food, housing, arts, customs).

 

Girl Scouts

Studio B Girl Scouts

Digging Through the Past: Skill Building 4 - Find out how archaeologists and anthropologists make discoveries about past cultures. Learn what skills and scientific aids are needed for an excavation, and what different objects reveal about the past.

  • Entire trunk.

 

Cub Scouts

Wolf Cub

Elective 10 - American Indian Lore: Make a model of a traditional American Indian house.

  • This trunk contains a footprint made from an archeological excavation of a Wichita grass lodge, pictures of a grass lodge in various steps of completion. The trunk also contains several object related to the construction of a grass lodge.

Bear Cub

Elective 24 - American Indian Life:  c) Learn what the American Indian people in your area used for shelter before contact with Europeans. Make a model of a shelter.

  • This trunk contains a footprint made from an archeological excavation of a Wichita grass lodge, pictures of a grass lodge in various steps of completion. The trunk also contains several object related to the construction of a grass lodge.

 

Boy Scouts

Researching an object.Merit Badges

Archaeology Badge - 3. Describe at least two ways in which archaeologists determine the age of sites, structures, or artifacts. Explain what relative dating is.

  • Lesson 4: Dating: How Archeologists Know What They Know

Archaeology Badge - 6a. Explain why it is important to protect archaeological sites.

  • Lesson 6: Site Preservation: Why the Archeological Record Needs to be Protected

Archaeology Badge - 11a. Research American Indians who live or once lived in your area. Find out about traditiona lifeways, dwellings, clothing styles, arts and crafts, and methods of food gathering, preparation, and storage. Describe what you would expect to find at an archaeological site for these people.

  • Lesson 2: Archeology: What is It?

  • Lesson 3: Observation and Inference: How Archeologists Know What They Know

  • Lesson 4: Dating: How Archeologists Know What They Know

  • Lesson 5: Ethnography: How Archeologists Know What They Know

 

Return to Puzzles From the Past:  Problem Solving Through Archeology Traveling Resource Trunk