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Museum After Hours

An all new virtual Museum After Hours series is available, 6:30 p.m. the second Friday of each month. The programs are free and offered at 6:30 p.m. on the second Friday of each month. 

Register for virtual Museum After Hours programs using the links below. 100-person limit. Programs also stream live on YouTube on the Kansas Historical Society channel.  These programs are free. Donations are welcome to help support programming.

Duty Beyond the Battlefield: African American Soldiers Fight for Racial Uplift, Citizenship, and Manhood, 1870-1920 - Dr. Le'Trice Donaldson, author

Friday, November 12, 2021 at 6:30 p.m.

It is said that the military uniform of the United States Army had the ability to transform a slave into a soldier. By serving in the military, African American men gained the confidence to assert their claim to citizenship and manhood. Dr. Le’Trice Donaldson examines how Black soldiers’ military service shaped their desire for equal rights, demanding the country keep its promise that “all men are created equal.” Their civil rights work after the Civil War forever shaped the Long Civil Rights Movement.

Register here

This program will also stream live on YouTube on the Kansas Historical Society channel.

 

Langston Hughes: Born on a Troubled Road - Dr. Carmaletta Williams, historian

Friday, December 10, 2021 at 6:30 p.m.

The man who was America's Negro Poet Laureate or "Poet Low-Rate" as he self-describes was born on a troubled road.  Documents suggest that Langston's self-hating father was not in Joplin, Missouri when his son was born.  His mother, Carrie, was born with what Zora Neale Hurston calls "traveling feet."  She deposited her son in Lawrence, Kansas with her mother as she traveled looking for a better life.  Langston survived, thrived and rose to prominence on his own.  This is his story.  Dr. Carmaletta Williams is the Director of the Black Archives of Mid-America in Kansas City.

Register here

This program will also stream live on YouTube on the Kansas Historical Society channel.

 

Haskell Institute:  Assimilation and Persistence, 1884-1909 - Dr. Eric Anderson, historian

Friday, January 14, 2022 at 6:30 p.m.

Dr. Anderson examines the roots of federal policies that created a system of boarding schools for American Indian youth beginning in the late nineteenth century.  These schools focused on assimilating Native children into mainstream U.S. society by stripping away ties to traditional cultures and communities.  Life at school was often a harsh and difficult experience with mixed results.  Despite the widespread network of schools and multiple generations of Indian students who attended them, Native cultures persisted and remain alive today, although the legacy of this re-education impacted American Indian and Alaska Native people deeply.  Haskell Indian Nations University, which emerged from Haskell Institute, is now a place for Native-centered education that celebrates the history and traditions of Indigenous Nations while focusing on the needs of contemporary Native American communities and people.

Register here

This program will also stream live on YouTube on the Kansas Historical Society channel.

 

No Place Like Home: Lessons in Activism from LGBT Kansas - C.J. Janovy, author

Friday, February 11, 2022 at 6:30 p.m.

This is the epic story of how a few disorganized and politically naive Kansans, realizing they were unfairly under attack, rolled up their sleeves, went looking for fights, and ended up making friends in one of the country's most hostile states. Or, as C.J. Janovy likes to say, it's a love story. Janovy’s book, No Place Like Home: Lessons in Activism from LGBT Kansas, was honored as a Kansas Notable Book for 2019.

Register here

This program will also stream live on YouTube on the Kansas Historical Society channel.

 

Many Museum After Hours programs have been recorded and are available through the Kansas Historical Society's YouTube channel.

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